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Dating elkington silver plate

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Much of the charm and interest in British silver hallmarks lies in their variety and individuality.

However the main object of silver hallmarking was and is to protect the public against fraud.

If you want to learn more about famous British silversmiths then click here (an ongoing project).

If you want to learn more about silver-smithing then click here.

1853, Elkington & Co., maker, with scrolled rim with floral and foliate accents and an engraved surface centering an engraved name, lg. mark, other with date mark for 1849, each with glass dish set into a faux-bois frame and More ... Silver-plate Tazzas, Birmingham, mid-19th century, one bearing Elkington, Mason & Co. Twelve Victorian Silver-plate Napkin Rings, Birmingham, 1872-73, Elkington & Co., maker, each gold-washed with an applied strapwork medallion featuring the head of Bacchus, with engraved numbers More ... Silver-plate Wine Coolers, Birmingham, probably 1853-54, each of campana form, with an inset liner, flared mouth, central presentation engraving, and applied More ...

Silver-plate Tazzas, Birmingham, mid-19th century, one bearing Elkington, Mason & Co. 1872, attributed to designer James Horton Whitehouse, base marked 2960/804, the dishes marked 2460/6832, the central mirrored surface More ... Champleve and Bronze Tazza, mid to late 19th century, attributed to Auguste-Adolphe Willms, each with blue, red, and black enameling highlighting an anthemion More ...

Throughout the years of its storied legacy, Elkington Silver Company has been granted royal warrants by Queen Victoria, Queen Alexandra, King George V, King Edward VII, Queen Mary, and King George VI, among many others.

This is a distinctive honor bestowed upon companies who have supplied members of the royal family with goods or services. Read more Elkington Silver Company is one of the premiere producers of flatware and plates.

The first step in deciphering these marks is to learn what kinds of silver are out there.

Six Edward VII Sterling Silver Cordials, Birmingham, 1908-09, Elkington & Co., maker, in the Arts and Crafts style with a tripartite stem terminating in a flowerhead motif to foot, ht. mark, other with date mark for 1849, each with glass dish set into a faux-bois frame and More ... Victorian Sterling Silver and Glass Center Bowl, Birmingham, 1892-93, Elkington & Co., maker, with an oval colorless cut glass bowl, on a silver stand with two winged sea-lions, total ht. Victorian Sterling Silver Tankard, Birmingham, 1867-68, Elkington & Co., maker, cylindrical, with a domed lid and dog-form thumb-piece, the body with foliate scrollwork centering a vacant cartouche, More ... Group of Silver and Silver-plated Tableware, including a bird table decoration, assorted small dishes, shakers, a German .800 silver inkwell with glass insert, and an Elkington & Co. Silver-plate Salad Servers with Cameo Glass Handles, late 19th/early 20th century, tine and spoon marked for Elkington & Co., handles with cameo-cut floral motifs on an opaque ivory ground, handles More ...

Pair of Victorian Sterling Silver Ewers, Birmingham, 1869-70, Elkington & Co., maker, each inverted baluster form, with elongated handle and engraved neoclassical maidens, ht. Nine Pieces of Sterling Silver Tableware, including a pair of monogrammed Reed & Barton shakers, a small Herbst & Wassall cylindrical covered box, an Elkington & Co. Group of Silver-plated Tableware, including a pair of Elkington covered soup tureens with associated ladles, a Reed & Barton water pitcher, a dome-top warming dish, a James Dixon & Son Sheffield More ... Five Victorian Sterling Silver Creamers, three London: one 1839-40, John Tapley, maker, with paneled sides and four scrolled foliate feet, ht.

This standard -- 92.5 parts pure silver to 7.5 parts copper alloy, which strengthens the softer silver -- was established by the English during the 12th century and later adopted by most of the silver-making world, including the United States in 1868Many people think of coin as much less valuable than sterling, but it has only about 2 percent less silver and, in some cases, may even contain more.

Because of its age and beauty, a piece made from coin can sometimes be worth more than American sterling.